NAIFA: Government-run option not a viable solution

A government-run health insurance option is misguided and would pose significant “economic drain” on the states, NAIFA President Jules Gaudreau said in response to recent endorsements from the White House and the Hillary Clinton campaign for a public plan.

“NAIFA strongly opposes a government run public plan that would unfairly compete with the private health insurance market, divide risk pools and pile-on significant unnecessary costs to health care reform,” Gaudreau said.” A government-run plan would create an inherently un-level playing field that would hinder consumers’ access to flexible, efficient and sustainable private insurance products.” 

NAIFA agrees with concerns shared by Sens. Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND), Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) and Mark Warner (D-VA), that a public option could present complications and potential harm to the marketplace.

Complete statement from NAIFA President Jules Gaudreau, Jr., ChFC, CHC

"The idea of government-run health insurance - while misguided - isn't new. The Obama health reform debate began with an alarming proclamation by Nancy Ann DeParle explaining why a government run option was desirable - “It doesn’t have the need to have brokers out selling” stated the then Assistant to the President and Deputy Chief of Staff for Policy on April 15, 2009.

"NAIFA strongly opposes a government run public plan that would unfairly compete with the private health insurance market, divide risk pools and pile-on significant unnecessary costs to health care reform. A government-run plan would create an inherently un-level playing field that would hinder consumers’ access to flexible, efficient and sustainable private insurance products.

"A government-run public plan also would pose a huge economic drain on states. The potential loss of millions of insurance-related jobs and billions in annual state premium tax revenues would be devastating to our already financially strapped state economies.

"And while we’ve always known the value NAIFA members provide to consumers, the Administration has come to realize the value of agents and brokers in helping consumers with coverage as well. From the Healthcare.gov website

"'Agents and brokers also play a key role in the Health Insurance Marketplace. To the extent permitted by states, agents and brokers play an important role in educating consumers about Marketplaces and insurance affordability programs, and helping consumers receive eligibility determinations, apply for premium tax credits and cost-sharing reductions, compare plans, and enroll in coverage. In particular, agents and brokers play a critical role in helping qualified employers and employees enroll in coverage through the Small Business Health Options Program (SHOP). Consumers may want to obtain professional advice from agents and brokers when applying for and selecting a qualified health plan.'

"NAIFA believes that choice, quality, competition and professional service must be a part of any health care reform effort.  Furthermore, licensed, fairly compensated, insurance agents offer a cost effective means of achieving personal and professional assistance in the selection of insurance coverage for individuals and employers of all sizes in all markets.

"NAIFA continues to work with lawmakers, both in DC and in their districts, to find ways to achieve affordable health care coverage and to dispel the myth that a government-run health care is a viable solution."
 
  • Posted July 14, 2016 IN
  • Comments (1)


Comments
Denwood Parrish
There is already virtually universal health care (Medicare) for all over age 65. In addition, the substantial gaps in Medicare are filled by a robust private market. President Gaudreau tells us that government-run health insurance is costly and inefficient when compared to the private market. Therefore, Medicare is costly, inefficient, and should transition to the private market. Perhaps an incremental approach would be this: in steps decrease the benefits of government-run Medicare and allow the private market to take up the slack but beefing up the market for Medicare gap coverage. The elephant in the health care room still is deciding to what extent health care needs to be provided for everyone, how to get those who need it and can afford it, whether self-insured or contractually insured. To me it would appear that each citizen has the responsibility to establish and pay for 1. emergency and retirement savings, 2. education (3 R's, civics, and job skills), 3. health care, and 4. the same three items for all dependents, including insuring future earnings should the citizen become unable to provide those earnings. But wait! The primary marketplace insists that first the citizen consider first purchasing special organic groceries, a smartphone, broadcast, streaming or other entertainment, paying to view or attend sports events, and engage in periodic vacations and travel, personal grooming beyond a neat appearance, etc.. Think of all the jobs that would be lost and all the taxes that wouldn't be collected if the citizen did not answer the call of this primary marketplace.
7/14/2016 12:06:16 PM